Quabaug

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Native Northeast Research Collaborative
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Work, Poverty, & Economy, Geography, Land, & the Environment, Culture & Society, Politics, Power, & Sovereignty, Arts & Abstract Ideas
Summary
Information provided about a party of Indians from Canada who attacked numerous colonial settlements
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Community
Native Northeast Research Collaborative, Natick
Category
Geography, Land, & the Environment, Culture & Society, Politics, Power, & Sovereignty
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Community
Native Northeast Research Collaborative, Natick
Category
Education, Religion, & Missionary Efforts, Culture & Society, Politics, Power, & Sovereignty

To the Honorable Court, the Governor,1 Deputy Governor,2 the Magistrates, and Deputies Now Assembled

Tribes

Konkewasco

Konkewasco was a Quabaug sachem from the village of Tantaskwee and may have been related to Wetoleshen, a former tribal leader.  Because of former alliances and his distrust of Philip, he was one of the signatories of a peace treaty with the English on June 25, 1675.  Some have claimed that he later reneged on his promise and joined Philip, as did many others who signed the treaty.  Yet, at least one writer has insisted on his continued loyalty to the English.

Muttaump, - 1676

Muttaump was a sachem of Quabaug during King Philip’s War who led the attack at Bloody Brook.  His wife was captured at Washacum Pond by Captain Daniel Henchman at the end of May, 1676 and sent into West Indies slavery.  Muttaump submitted to the English in July of that year and was hanged on September 26, 1676.  George William Ellis and John E. Morris, King Philip’s War (New York: The Grafton Press, 1906), 87, 112, 242, 257, 286.  

Mecurius de Quabaug or a Declaration of the Dealings of Uncas and the Mohegan Indians to certain

Indians, the Inhabitants of Quabaug

May 21, 1661

David

Great David was a sagamore at Quabaug in the southeastern part of Brookfield, Massachusetts, who through the influence of John Eliot, it is claimed, received his Christian name.  Capt. Samuel Mosley suspected David to be complicit in the attack against Lancaster on August 22, 1675.  Tying the sagamore to a tree and pointing a gun at him, he interrogated David until the Indian implicated a number of Hassanemesit Indians.