North America -- United States of America -- State of Connecticut -- State of Connecticut -- Farmington {Id= 115}

Indigenous Name:  Tunxis Sepos
Territorial Homeland: Tunxis
Associated Tribal Affiliations:

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Farmington was settled by English colonists by 1640 and established as a town in 1645.  In 1779 Farmington’s South Society became Southington.  In 1785, what was known as New Cambridge became Bristol and that same year the Town of Berlin was created from Farmington, Middletown, and Wethersfield.  In 1830 Avon was created from the Northington part of Farmington, and in 1835, Bloomfield (formerly Wintonbury) was created from Windsor, Farmington, and Simsbury.  In 1869 Plainville was created out of Farmington’s Great Plain.


Native Place Names


  • “Fort Hill” is high ground east of Pequabuck Meadow.  It was there that the Tunxis removed their main village in 1658.  It was sometimes called the Little Meadow.  CPN.  Arthur Brandegee and Eddy N. Smith, Farmington, Connecticut, The Village of Beautiful Homes (Farmington, CT: Brandegee and Smith, 1906), 60.
  • “Indian Neck” is a tract of land containing about two hundred acres bounded east and south by the Tunxis River.  In 1650, Ahamo the Tunxis sachem, negotiated an agreement with colonists to protect the land there from encroachment.  But by 1672 English trespassing had become alarming, and the tribe sought the assistance of the Connecticut General Assembly.  The following year, the Neck was reconfirmed to the Tunxis tribe. During the 17th century, to the dismay of Tunxis authorities, some tribal members leased or occasionally sold off  in small parcels there.  In 1773 a committee appointed by the Connecticut General Assembly divided the remaining property among thirty-seven of the tribe in lots of various sizes.  Arthur Brandegee and Eddy N. Smith, Farmington, Connecticut, The Village of Beautiful Homes (Farmington, CT: Brandegee and Smith, 1906), 58, 62-63.
  • Pequabuck (“river from a clear pond”) is a river that flows from Marshy Pond in Bristol through the village of Tunxis and join into the Tunxis-sepos.  It is also known as the Little River.  CPN.
  • Tunxis-sepos (“bow of the river” “Place where the river bends” ) is a fast-moving river in the middle of the Tunxis country.  Also called the Farmington River. The name Tunxis was used for land on or near the river at its southern bend and the Native people that lived there. JT/CPN
  • Wepansock (“narrow place”) is a circular hill in Farmington meadows, about half a mile from the main street, which covered about twelve acres.  It served as the center for determining the bounds of Farmington.  Also known as Round Hill. JT/CPN
  • “Will Warren’s Den” is a small cave on Rattlesnake Mountain which served as the stony residence of William Warren and his Tunxis wife.  Arthur Brandegee and Eddy N. Smith, “The Legend of Will Warren’s Den,” Farmington, Connecticut, The Village of Beautiful Homes (Farmington, CT: Brandegee and Smith, 1906), 42-43.

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