Herring Pond Wampanoag Tribe

We are the Wampanoag Tribe of Plymouth Indians, known present day as the Herring Pond Wampanoag Tribe, also identified in historical documents as Comassakumkanit, Herring Pond Indians, Pondville Indians, Manomet, and Praying Indians, among others.

We have lived on these lands for thousands of years. We are a tribal community whose ancestral lands are located at the heart of the long history of colonization and appropriation of indigenous lands in North America: Plymouth, Massachusetts. We have continued to live within our homeland, and today we continue our struggle to protect our cultural heritage and land rights, and avoid erasure as an indigenous people. Our sacred places include our cemeteries and our meetinghouse (Pondville Indian Church) located in Plymouth and Bourne. To us, these are the places of our ancestors and we are obligated to protect, and to preserve them, for our children now and for all of our descendants to come.

Our historical reservation lands, which previously contained three separate parcels, mostly in Plymouth but partly in Bourne, total approximately 3,000 acres, namely the Great Lot (about 2,600 acres), the Meetinghouse Lot (about 200 acres) and the Herring River Lot, known to the tribe in the 21st Century as “The Valley” (about 400 acres) all of which were lost, taken or conveyed for reasons unknown to the Tribe. We are still here!!

Recent DH Items
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Community
Native Northeast Research Collaborative, Mashpee Wampanoag, Herring Pond Wampanoag Tribe, Chappaquiddick
Category
Education, Religion, & Missionary Efforts, Politics, Power, & Sovereignty
Summary
James Walker's notes on Phineas Fish's appointment at Mashpee and listing of families there, with mention of other Vineyard Native congregants
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Community
Mashpee Wampanoag, Herring Pond Wampanoag Tribe, Native Northeast Research Collaborative
Category
Education, Religion, & Missionary Efforts, Culture & Society, Politics, Power, & Sovereignty
Summary
James Walker's questions regarding Mashpee, Herring Pond, and Martha's Vineyard, with partial replies
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Community
Native Northeast Research Collaborative, Mashpee Wampanoag, Herring Pond Wampanoag Tribe
Category
Education, Religion, & Missionary Efforts, Work, Poverty, & Economy, Culture & Society, Politics, Power, & Sovereignty
Summary
A response to Walker's questions about Fish's missionary work to the Mashpee and their open rebellion again him
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Community
Native Northeast Research Collaborative, Mashpee Wampanoag, Herring Pond Wampanoag Tribe
Category
Education, Religion, & Missionary Efforts, Work, Poverty, & Economy, Geography, Land, & the Environment, Culture & Society, Politics, Power, & Sovereignty, Arts & Abstract Ideas
Summary
An evaluation of the state of affairs at Mashpee with respect to the spending of the Williams Fund
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Community
Native Northeast Research Collaborative, Mashpee Wampanoag, Herring Pond Wampanoag Tribe
Category
Education, Religion, & Missionary Efforts, Work, Poverty, & Economy, Geography, Land, & the Environment, Culture & Society, Politics, Power, & Sovereignty
Summary
A second revised printing of a section from William Apes' Indian Nullification