Pocumtuck

To the Honoured General Court at Boston, June 3, 1671

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Community
Native Northeast Research Collaborative
Category
Work, Poverty, & Economy, Geography, Land, & the Environment, Culture & Society, Politics, Power, & Sovereignty, Arts & Abstract Ideas
Summary
Information provided about a party of Indians from Canada who attacked numerous colonial settlements
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Community
Native Northeast Research Collaborative, Tunxis, Mohegan Tribe
Category
Geography, Land, & the Environment, Culture & Society

Wallump

Wallump was the son of Alquat, the sachem of the Woronoke and Pochassic.  Recorded deeds indicate that from 1669 to 1673, at least, he received and conveyed land within Pocomptuck territory.  In one instance he was sued by Thomas Cooper, but after hearing evidence in the matter, a jury found for Wallump, granting his the payment of his court costs, ten shillings. Wright, Indian Deeds of Hampden County,  43, 69-73.

Alquat

Alquat (alias Keems) was the sachem of Woronoke and Pochassic, villages in the Pocumtuck confederacy.  He had at least one son, Wollump.  In 1669 Alquat sold several hundred acres of his territory, reserving seven acres for Wollump.  The following year, the father and son sold the seven acres to John Pynchon and Joseph Whiting in order to buy five acres of planting land.  Alquat disappears from the documentary record by 1673.  He may have died by then or relinquished his authority to his son. Wright, Indian Deeds of Hampden County, 69-73.

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Community
Native Northeast Research Collaborative, Natick, Pocumtuck
Category
Geography, Land, & the Environment, Culture & Society, Politics, Power, & Sovereignty
Summary
A request of Alquat And Walumpe of Pohassick seeking payment for land illegally claimed by Westfield residents

When we came to Uncas’ fort at Mohegan, with many fears and threats we were entertained, as after we were entered the fort and Uncas’ wigwam, one without called unto the men to why they have sat [ illegible ] for they should have work a now with these by and by [ illegible ] were sitting down and pausing (after their manner) a while I told Uncas that these Indians were messengers from the Governor and all the Magistrates of the Massachusetts, and that they had brought a letter unto me from them to be communicated unto him.  Then taki