Return upon Bill of Presentment against John Strothers

John Stoddard of New London is presented for most wickedly rising up against his neighbor Mrs. Bolles and with an ax striking her on the head twice whereby he hath taken away the life of one of his majesty’s subjects.  The like presentment is made against John Stoddard for most wickedly rising up against the daughter of said Bolles and smiting her on the head, whereby he hath taken away the life of one of his majesty’s subjects.  The like presentment is made against John Stoddard for most wickedly rising up against the son of the said Bolles and smiting him on the head, whereby he hath taken away the life of one of his majesty’s subjects.

Kesequonunt thou art presented for rising up against Mrs. Bolles of New London and smiting her and two of her children with an ax, whereby he hath taken away the life of those his majesty’s subjects.

Keweebhunt thou art presented for rising up against Mrs. Bolles of New London and smiting her and two of her children with an ax, whereby he hath taken away the life of those his majesty’s subjects.

            Endorsement:  Concerning the prisoner John Stoddard, we find the bill against hi[m] [cut]1

                                    Concerning the Indians we find them not guilty of the bill

                                    The Grand Jury’s return upon the bill of presentment laid against John Stoddard,

                                    Kesequonunt and Keweebhunt/October 3, 1678

            Cataloguing:  112, 112a-b, 125

 
  • 1. The manuscript is cut at this point rendering the last part of the sentence unknown.  The historical record shows that John Stoddard was found guilty of the murders.
Tribes