Bill from Dr. Daniel King to Eneas Morgan and Stephen Billings, Overseers to the Western Pequot Indians

Pequot Tribe of Indians to Dan King
 
Debit
 
 
 
 
 
1820
 
 
September
To visit and medicine for Sarah
      $1.00
 
To visit for Dosia
          .75
 
To visit and sundry medicine for John Nedson
        1.00
 
To medicine for Betsy Wheeler
          .34
 
To visit and sundry medicine for John Nedson
        1.00
 
To visit and sundry medicine for Ann Wampey
          .92
 
To opium[1] for Ann Wampey
          .25
October 18
To medicine for John Nedson
          .50
October 18
To bleeding[2] Ann Wampey
          .25
October 20
To rhubarb[3] and direction for John Nedson
          .50
 
To visit and sundry medicine for Sarah
        1.00
November
To visit and sundry medicine for John Nedson
          .50
 
To visit and medicine for Sarah
          .58
 
To visit and medicine for John Nedson
          .50
 
To visit and medicine for Lois Charles
          .67
November 10
To medicine for Betsy Wheeler
          .17
November 10
To visit and medicine for Sarah
        1.00
 
 
 
To medicine for Betsy Squib
          .38
November 15     
To visit and medicine for Sarah
        1.00
 
To visit and sundry medicine for Phebe in the night
      +1.25
 
 
    $13.73
 
 
 
 
To medicine for Lois Charles
          .20
February
To visit and medicine for Hannah Miller
          .72
 
To visit and sundry medicine for Phebe
        1.00
 
To visit and medicine for Dosia
          .75
 
To visit and medicine for Stephen[5]
          .92
 
To visit and sundry medicine for Lydia[6]
          .84
 
 
        4.26
 
[ Amount carried over ]
    +13.73
 
 
    $17.99
October 20
To visit and sundry medicines for Peter George in the night
      +1.00
 
 
      18.99
 
 
-.17[7]
 
 
    $ 18.82
 
Dan King
 
 
February 10, 1821
 
 
 
 
 
Endorsement:     Received payment in full, Dan King / Account Doctor Dan
                           King, Receipted February 14 / Pequot Tribe of Indians / 
                           Amount $18.99
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
[1] Opium, whether in grain form or tincture (laudanum), was used to treat a variety of conditions to include, general pain, cough, rheumatism, insomnia, and, due to its constipating effect, cholera, dysentery, and diarrhea. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opium
[2] Controlled bloodletting has a long history in medical practice dating back thousands of years. While technique and purpose evolved over the years, by the early nineteenth century many doctors still employed the practice as way bring into balance what were then believed to be the various elements in the body. https://bcmj.org/premise/history-bloodletting
[3] The rhubarb mentioned here is most likely Rheum officinale. A powder derived from the root was then commonly used either as a purgative or as a mild stomach stimulant depending on the dosage. J. L. Corish, ed., Health Knowledge, Vol. 2 (New York, 1920), 1203.
[4] Here King crossed out a November 1820 reference to “Bleeding Eunice Apes”. While his reason for removing this from his bill will likely remain unknown, it is possible that Eunice Apes was not recognized by either the overseer or the community itself as having a right to support from the tribal funds and hence was not a reimbursable expense.
[5] This may be a reference to Stephen Sunsamon.
[6] This is likely a reference to Lydia Hendricks.
[7] The subtraction of this 17 cents is associated with the treatment of Eunice Apes referenced in an earlier footnote.