Queppish, Ebenezer

Ebenezer was an active figure in Mashpee political life.  

In 1783, as Ebenezer Dives, he signed a deed which appropriated a 400 acre wood lot for the use of a parsonage at Mashpee.  An appellate decision on a case between some Mashpee and Phineas Fish in 1842 described Ebenezer Dives at that time as one of a few chief headmen of the Mashpee community. Ebenezer Queppish signed a number of petitions, some as first signatory,  between 1788-1807. Each of these petitions complained of infringements on the community’s autonomy and religious freedom.   

Copy of the Deed of Marshpee Parsonage, 1783.01.07.00.  Attaquin & Others v. Fish, Metcalf, Reports of Cases Argued and Determined in the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts, Vol. V, October Term, 1842, 143.  Petition of the Mashpee Indians to the Massachusetts General Court, 1788.07.30.00; Petition of Elijah Pocknet and Other Mashpee Indians to to the Legislature of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 1792.01.14.00; Petition of Sarah Mye and Other Mashpee Indians to the Legislature of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 1792.05.28.00; Petition and Remonstrance of Ebenezer Queppish and Other Mashpee Indians to the Legislature of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 1795.05.20.00; Petition of Noah Webquish and Other Mashpee Indians to the Legislature of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 1796.02.22.00; Petition of Moses Pocknet and Other Mashpee and Herring Pond Indians to the Legislature of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 1807.00.00.00

Alias(es)
Ebenezer Dives
Tribes
Ethnicity