Herring Pond

We are the Wampanoag Tribe of Plymouth Indians, known present day as the Herring Pond Wampanoag Tribe, also identified in historical documents as Comassakumkanit, Herring Pond Indians, Pondville Indians, Manomet, and Praying Indians, among others.

We have lived on these lands for thousands of years. We are a tribal community whose ancestral lands are located at the heart of the long history of colonization and appropriation of indigenous lands in North America: Plymouth, Massachusetts. We have continued to live within our homeland, and today we continue our struggle to protect our cultural heritage and land rights, and avoid erasure as an indigenous people. Our sacred places include our cemeteries and our meetinghouse (Pondville Indian Church) located in Plymouth and Bourne. To us, these are the places of our ancestors and we are obligated to protect, and to preserve them, for our children now and for all of our descendants to come.

Our historical reservation lands, which previously contained three separate parcels, mostly in Plymouth but partly in Bourne, total approximately 3,000 acres, namely the Great Lot (about 2,600 acres), the Meetinghouse Lot (about 200 acres) and the Herring River Lot, known to the tribe in the 21st Century as “The Valley” (about 400 acres) all of which were lost, taken or conveyed for reasons unknown to the Tribe. We are still here!!

Where the Oneidas have /l/ the Mohawks have /lr/.     
 
Mohawk
                                                           
rauganeehauh              father                                      
keűh                             child                                       
                                                                                   
loóneh                          wife                                                                
Neipispauket
Pumspisset                    Herring River
 
Wauquunchet pond       East of Quinsuit
Chaucquoke                  White folks
Woponawx                    English
Mooaunaups                 Negroes
Kautaănt                       Great man above
 

Rock ore makes better iron than bog ore. Three tons Assawompset ore yield one ton of iron.

Ponaganset Friends Meeting, 65 by 28

1762   

As I passed round the head of Buzzards Bay at north east at and about Quonset appeared a great quantity of shells which indicate the ancient residence of Indians, but now all gone.

From Mr. Williams1 and an Indian, aged 84, I learned that originally there were three sachemdoms on the Cape.

Honoured Sir,

I received your favour of November 251 on the 28th of the same. As it required some time to reply as I wished, you will please to excuse the delay. I give an account of my mission with cheerfulness. Having no cause for concealment, I will endeavor to give as “precise and exact” a statement as I am able.

Honoured Sir,

I received your favour of November 25. on the 28th of the same. As it required some time to reply as I wished, you will please to excuse the delay. I give an account of my mission with cheerfulness. Having no cause for concealment, I will endeavor to give as “precise and exact” a statement as I am able.

1. Number of Indians attending Public Worship.

The Corporation of Harvard College, being entrusted with certain funds, destined for the support of the Gospel, among the Indians, employed Mr. Phineas Fish as a Candidate in the Plantation of Mashpee. It having appeared that he is acceptable and useful in that situation, he has been invited to take the pastoral charge of the people in that place, with occasional services to the Indians at Herring Pond, to which invitation he has consented.

The undersigned, Overseers of the Plantation of Mashpee, in the County of Barnstable, in consideration that the Reverend Mr.

Summary: 
A contract from the Overseers of Mashpee providing Phineas fish with the annual use of certain Mashpee lands and a recommendation to convey a deed for land on which his house may be built
Community: 
Native Northeast Research Collaborative, Mashpee Wampanoag
Category: 
Education, Religion, & Missionary Efforts, Work, Poverty, & Economy, Geography, Land, & the Environment, Culture & Society, Politics, Power, & Sovereignty
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